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Doctoral Program Assessment


Assessment Plan

TEAL Graduate Faculty utilize several key junctures in the program to monitor student success and assess learning:

  1. Coursework
  2. Annual Reviews
  3. Ongoing Advisement
  4. Comprehensive Examination
  5. Completion of Residency Requirements (Presentations and Publications) (forthcoming)
  6. Dissertation Proposal Defense (forthcoming)
  7. Dissertation Research (forthcoming)

Currently the Comprehensive Examination is used to indicate student learning of course content and readiness to design and conduct ethical, rigorous, and independent research.  The TEAL Comprehensive Examination is offered in two formats (Plan A—8-hour, on-campus session; Plan B—72-hour at-home session).  In both cases, the student must address three questions that target the three areas of instructional content:  Curriculum and Instruction (10 credits), Research Methods (12 credits), and the student’s area of Concentration (24-26 credits).  Thus, the Comprehensive Examination provides an assessment of Learning Objectives 1-4. 

Learning Objectives: 5-6 are currently assessed by students’ Supervisory Committee members during the respective defenses.  The use of scoring rubrics to more specifically evaluate these products and processes are currently being considered by TEAL Graduate Faculty.

Planned Assessment Plan Goals:

  1. 2020—Determine ways to use Annual Reviews and Residency Requirement forms to inform assessment of student learning.
  2. 2020—Determine way(s) to evaluate dissertation proposals and dissertations to assess Objectives 5 and 6.
  3. 2020—Improve documentation of graduates’ presentations, publications, and job placements.


Core Learning Objectives

  1. Explore the interrelationships among education, schooling, and society to support learning among all students.
  2. Analyze how the constructs of teaching and learning have been conceptualized by major scholars and applied in educational contexts over the past century.
  3. Investigate the relationships between and among curricula, teachers, students, and educational contexts.
  4. Develop research skills using qualitative and quantitative methods that can contribute to the extant scholarship influencing education.
  5. Understand the opportunities and challenges for educational researchers to design, conduct, and communicate research to examine a significant problem or issue in education.
  6. Develop an emerging expertise in a selected field of education that has the potential to improve educational outcomes.


Outcome Data

Numbers of TEAL Doctoral Students at Important Junctures of the Ph.D. Program, 2017-2019

Year

Number Admitted*

Number Continuing

Number Withdrawn

Number Completing

Comprehensive Exam

Number Proposing Dissertation Plan

Number Defending Dissertation Study

2017

8

94

1 (.016%)

23

8

15

2018

32

87

2 (.02%)

14

19

23

2019

10

96

2 (.02%)

11

9

20

*Admission numbers vary because the distance–delivered program option admits students on a 2-year cycle.  Odd-year admissions are for Logan-only students.

TEAL Comprehensive Examination Results by Level of Quality

 

Pass with Distinction

Pass

Revise

Fail

Totals

2017

6 (26%)

12 (52%)

3 (13%)

2 (9%)

23 (48%)

2018

5 (36%)

9 (64%)

0

0

14 (29%)

2019

3 (27%)

5(46%)

1 (9%)

2 (18%)

11 (23%)

Total

14 (29%)

26 (55%)

4 (8%)

4 (8%)

48

 

TEAL Comprehensive Examination Results by Section of Exam

 

Curriculum & Instruction

Research Methods

Concentration Area

Year

Pass

Revise

Fail

Pass

Revise

Fail

Pass

Revise

Fail

2017

23

2

0

19

4

0

23

0

0

2018

14

0

0

14

0

0

14

0

0

2019

9

2

0

9

2

0

8

3

0

Totals

46

2

0

42

6

0

46

2

0



Data-based Decisions

  1. 2017—Established the assigning and completion of the Comprehensive Examination to a Canvas platform to centralize the process, archive the responses, utilize the Turnitin option, and afford more specific assessment of student learning.
  2. 2017—Increased the completion of the Annual Review advisement process to better communicate program expectations and support timely program completion.
  3. 2017—Promoted the documentation of Residency Requirements to encourage earlier engagement in conference presentations and student-authored publications.
  4. 2017—Work of the Ed.D. Task Force completed a revision of the Ed.D. program, which was approved by TEAL Graduate Faculty.
  5. 2017—Established the TEAL Outstanding Dissertation Award to identify and recognize excellent dissertations on an annual basis.
  6. 2017—Formalized a new doctoral concentration: Cultural Studies to broaden scope of course offerings and interest a wider range of students.
  7. 2018—Formalized a new doctoral concentration: Science Education to meet the need for more STEM-education researchers.
  8. 2018—Reviewed faculty capacity and decided to postpone the decision to offer the revitalized Ed.D. program.
  9. 2019—Determined a plan to submit dissertation proposals for plagiarism review to identify potential problems earlier in the dissertation phase.
  10. 2019—Conducted a year-long faculty discussion of expectations for the Monograph and Multiple-paper formats to establish requirements for policies and procedures, quality and rigor.
  11. 2019—Added the Science Education concentration to the Distance-doctoral program to recruit students across the state.
  12. 2019—Formalized the application process for Graduate Assistantships to make access more equitable.
  13. 2019—Added clarity to the expectation of Authorship for students and faculty mentors to increase the number of publications resulting from dissertation research.
  14. 2019—Added a scoring process for readers of the Comprehensive Exam to monitor effectiveness across the three areas of the exam with four possible outcomes: Pass with Distinction, Pass, Low Pass, Fail. (Objectives 1-4)
  15. 2019—Analyzed the Comprehensive Exam for relative strength and weaknesses across C&I, Research Methods, and Concentration areas.